6 Strategies to Increase Personal Productivity in Your Business

Everybody has twenty four hours in a day and how you use those hours, makes a world of difference in your life and business. Following are the six important strategies to increase your personal productivity so that you can be more effective in life as well as in your business. By implementing these strategies, you can reduce the time spent on unproductive activities and increase your focus and concentration on the tasks that matter to you the most.

Keep your WHY in front of you
Whenever you feel like not working in the business or getting bored or feel like taking it easy, remind yourself WHY you are doing the business in the first place. This will bring you back on track and keep you focused in the business.

Keep your accomplishments in front you
Keep your accomplishments in front of you so that you can see them daily and as often as you can. They will remind you that you are an accomplisher and you have a track record of successfully completing things. Whenever you are faced with a problem, for which you haven’t found a solution yet, you remind yourself that you are able to solve bigger problems than what you have at hand and you will find a solution to it. This composure helps your mind to seek a solution to the problem much faster.

Make a list of things that needs to be done
Make a list of things that needs to be done for a particular day or half a day or evening.
When you write them on the paper, you don’t have to memorize them and you can refer to them as often as you want. Prioritize the list so that you will know which tasks needs to be completed first. As you finish each task, cross off the item on the list.

Avoid time killers
When you are working on a task, do not divert your focus for answering a phone or checking an email. When you do that you lose concentration and it takes another 20 minutes before you can completely involve in the task at hand again.

Work on 50 minute intervals
Work on 50 minute time slots. We will not be able to effectively concentrate on one particular task for a long time. Work for 50 minutes and take 10 minutes break. Stretch you legs, drink a glass of water or go out into your back yard to breathe fresh air. This helps you to concentrate better on the task you are going to do next.

Reward yourself
Reward yourself when you finished a task or a set of tasks successfully. Give yourself a pat on the back and a word of encouragement. You will have the satisfaction of getting things done. This keeps you motivated to work harder.

Sekhar Gurugubelli is an Internet based business expert and mentor based out of Springfield, IL. He assists serious entrepreneurs in building a profitable online business with multiple income streams. Discover how you can leverage the internet and turn your computer into a money minting machine. To know more about the system he uses to generate income online, click here.

Good Time Management – The Cornerstone to High Personal Productivity

Understanding where your time goes

Before you can improve your personal productivity you need to understand how much time you are spending on your tasks.

The easiest way to do this is to record what you are doing every 15 minutes over a two week period. This may mean keeping a note book, or an open spreadsheet or something on your smart phone.

  • Record your time log over the next 2 weeks

Don’t worry about getting it absolutely right but you do need to select a typical 2 week period.

If the thought of creating a time log is off putting, another option is to simply quickly review each task as you come to it and carry out a simple test: is it important, urgent, necessary, a legal requirement, helps you towards your goals. If it does none of these things why are you doing it?

Creating a vision for yourself

In order to make the right choices you need to have a 6 – 12 month vision or objective as to what you want to have achieved at the end of that period so that you make the choices needed to achieve that objective. It allows you to say does what I am doing now help me achieve that goal? If it doesn’t why are you doing it?

  • Write down the key things that you want to achieve within the next 6-12 months

Analysing your time

If you have used a spreadsheet it should be a relatively easy to categorise each activity into important, urgent, a legal requirement, or helps you towards your goal.

Apply the 80-20 rule (Pareto Principle) to the tasks. The 80-20 rule states that 20% of a task’s efforts accounts for 80% of the value of the task. Identifying the 20% of your tasks that will lead to you achieving 80% of what you need to achieve is key to reaching your goals.

Creating an Action Plan

You now know what you are currently spending your time on and you also know what you want to achieve. To achieve those goals usually means doing the important but not urgent tasks. You need to create time for these tasks as they are usually non-routine and require blocks of quality time.

There are a range of tools that will help to improve your personal productivity:

  • Elimination: Can you eliminate the task?
  • Automation: Can’t eliminate it? Can you use technology to make it more efficient?
  • Delegation: Can’t eliminate it? Are you the best person to do it? Can you delegate or out source it?
  • Organisation: Organise what’s left. Clear your desk. Project or ongoing tasks in hanging files in your desk or pedestal. Key files in the filing cabinet. Archive what you legally need to keep. Scan in what you need but don’t need the paper. Shred the rest.
  • Cleanliness: Keep your workstation clean and clear of clutter.
  • Do It Now: If you can don tasks immediately, don’t keep rereading jobs on job lists or emails in your to box. Do it now. You will be surprised how many tasks only take a few minutes.
  • Batch process tasks: Only check you email at set times during the day. If appropriate, put your phone on voice mail and respond to calls at fixed times of the day. As a manager, if you get constant interruptions doing the working day, have times of the day when your door is closed and diarise important larger tasks in that time. Encourage your team to bring you possible solutions when they come to you with a problem.
  • Email Processing: When checking your email: Can it be deleted? Can you Do It Now? Can you delegate it? Can designate it (I.e. block some time in your diary to do it.)? Create reference folders for emails you need to keep. Create an action folder for tasks that take longer to do so that don’t sit in your inbox. Use rules to get rid of automated emails.
  • Sending emails: When sending emails, make the subject line clear. Only email those who need to read it. Keep it positive and short and to the point. No jokes.
  • Meetings: Can you avoid them? Can it be dealt with by email? If not will a phone call be okay? If you do have to have a meeting, make sure that everybody knows what to bring, make sure the meeting objectives are clear, don’t let the meeting be side tracked, arrange another meeting if some areas need further discussion. Agree actions and who will be responsible for their completion and by when. If you don’t need all the time that was allotted, wrap it up early.
  • Planning: Take time to plan your day, week and any projects. Set key 3-6 tasks that you want to achieve each day. Use your calendar to plan your week and what you need to get done in order to reach your goals. Most objectives require you to non-routine tasks. Plan mile stone dates for interim stages of the project and plan what you need to do to achieve them and by when. Consider using an electronic diary or app on your smart phone.
  • Information overload: Consider reducing the amount of information you read. Reduce it to what you need to read.
  • Use a log book: Use a log book to record actions that you need to carry out. Cross them out when complete.
  • Delegate effectively: Identify the correct person. Give the task as soon as you can. Clearly state the objectives. Provide all the information. Make sure that they understand the task. Set a deadline. Encourage a written plan or task list. Regularly monitor progress. Make yourself available for support. Assume responsibility but give credit for successes. Delegate the interesting work as well as the mundane.
  • Walk about: Avoid management by email and spreadsheet. Walk about. Use your eyes and ears to pick on the working atmosphere.
  • Problem solve: Go to the source of the problem and involve the staff with the problem in its solution.
  • Flow charts: Use simple flow charts to identify the flow of work process. Use this to eliminated wasted effort.
  • Identify the best times of the day for creative work: People work best at different times of the day. Organise your day so that you are doing creative and most challenging work when you are most effective.
  • Failure is okay: Sometimes you have to try a lot of things before you are successful. Learn from your mistakes and keep trying.
  • Avoid work for works sake: If a particular task does not help you achieve your goals then look to eliminate. There are always more positive things that you can be doing.
  • Identify customers or people who take time or profit from you: Some customers are so troublesome that they are not worth having as it costs more to service them than the profit they may generate.
  • Outsource tasks that you are not good at or add very little to: If a task has to be done such as payroll which is complicated and carries large penalties if you get it wrong then outsource as it has to be done but does not move you towards your goals.
  • Purpose solutions: If you want to do something that requires permission from either a customer or your boss then propose a solution for them to consider rather an asking them.
  • Less is not laziness: Doing less if it is effective is not laziness. It means that you can focus on more important matters if you have achieved more in less time.
  • Emphasise your strengths: Top athletes work on their strengths. Work on yours and find others to do tasks that you are less qualified to do.
  • Parkinson’s law: Watch and take action on those activities that take the time that they were allotted to it. Work out how you can do tasks more effectively in a shorter time.
  • Work life balance: Try to develop a work life balance. Make sure you are rested at the start of each working week.

Create a standard way of doing things

You need to create a maintenance way of working. This means routinely clearing your desk, email and files. It means each day identifying the key tasks that need to be done that day. It means developing habits that help you stay productive.

Sustaining your productivity gains

Like all habits good productivity needs to be maintained.

  • Create time to keep your desk, emails and project files clear.
  • If you have a deluge of important emails block out some time to clear them don’t let them pile up again. If necessary create a reference folder called archive and move them all into it. If it is important most people will resend or call you.
  • Review your goals. Have they changed? If so you will need to review which tasks are important and which can be eliminated.

Increase Your Personal Productivity With 3 Simple Strategies

You can use 3 simple strategies to increase your personal productivity and propel your Internet Marketing Business to the next level. Productivity can be an issue for Internet Marketers, or really anyone who runs their own business. One of the reasons people want to have their own business is to have control over their work schedule. But the freedom this allows, can lead to being non productive. Remember when you want to ‘be your own boss’ you have to BE the BOSS, and hold yourself accountable for getting work done. It is often too easy to get distracted and put off working until ‘later’, and then ‘later’ doesn’t arrive. Avoid this possibility by implementing these strategies.

Time commitment:

Set up specific time commitment to work on your business. It doesn’t have to be 8 hours a day, but it does need to be daily. OK so maybe you could take one day off – it is your business you decide. Write down your schedule and discuss this time commitment with the other members of your household. Make sure they are aware that you are committed to working on your business and request that they refrain from disturbing you furring this time. Use this time to do activities that will advance your business plan, do not spend it reading email, checking your stats, or chatting in forums. (Unless you are marketing on the forums). Focusing on income producing activities will bring the success you seek.

Prepare a business Plan:

You CAN begin without one. The important thing is to begin. However without a business plan, you won’t know which income producing activities to focus on. Most start their business plan with their overall desire (IE make $10,000 a month). But in the beginning stages of Internet Marketing, it may be more beneficial to begin setting goals that are more easily obtainable (IE build your website within a month). Then expand the plan as you become aware of your own marketing strategy strengths. Review and revise the plan as needed. Once you understand the basics and how much time it takes to accomplish the tasks involved you will be able to prepare a more comprehensive and realistic business plan. Then follow your plan.

Hold yourself accountable:

Give yourself a monthly review. (OK some may need a weekly or even daily review!) Remember to treat your business as a business and not a hobby. If you would like the income generated by a business, you must work it as a business. Be professional and give your best effort. If you cannot live up to your own expectations, working from home may not be the best idea for you. Consistent effort over time is the key to success in Internet Marketing as well as in life.

Increasing your personal productivity will be beneficial in your Internet Marketing. Make a business plan, commit to a predetermined work schedule, and hold yourself accountable to sticking with it. This is the kind of common sense advice your Grandmother would have told you, and it is still true. Productivity management could be an important aspect for achieving success.

Three Keys for Increasing Your Personal Productivity

What do the President of the US, the Queen of England, you, and the bum on the corner all have in common? Each has exactly 24 hours in a day – that’s 1,440 minutes, or 86,400 seconds exactly – no more and no less. What distinguishes each is not how much time they have, but how they use what they have. Let’s look at 3 keys for increasing your personal productivity and shifting the way you use time.

Start with a list

The great unwashed masses use their time reactively. Their day is largely spent reacting to others around them and to the circumstances that they find themselves in. Too much time spent in catch-up mode and too little time spent planning. Minutes spent in planning can save hours in execution.

Lists are essential for effective time management. You must put your list on paper (or computer). Keeping your list in your head is a sure way to increase your stress level and limit your productivity. You’ve got to get that list out of your head and onto something that you can look at. Some people hate lists and they come up with all kinds of lame excuses about why lists don’t work for them. That’s fine. Peak productivity is a choice. If it were easy, everyone would be highly accomplished. Peak performers always use lists.

Don’t worry if your list is too long. At least when you look at it you can deal with a lengthy list appropriately. Until it is committed to paper or computer, it is stuck in your head and your subconscious is stressing about the possibility of forgetting to do something important and how to get everything done. Getting your list out of your head actually reduces your stress.

Prioritize your list

Chances are your list is scary long. This is where setting priorities comes in. You want to organize your list around the highest priority items and do those first. By focusing on the high-priority items on your list, anything that is undone will always be less essential than what was done.

It is important to distinguish between the things on your list that are truly important and the things which may be urgent but aren’t really important at all. One technique for sorting things out is to ask yourself if you were to look at today’s list from a point in time 6 months into the future, which items would you be glad that you accomplished and which ones wouldn’t matter as much. Tackle the highest priority items first and work your way down in the order of relative importance. If there is more on your list than you can accomplish in one day, the stuff that is undone at the end of the day is of lesser importance than what was done.

Schedule

Some hours in your day are more valuable than others. Your most valuable hours are the hours where you are mentally freshest and have high energy. Becoming consciously aware of when you are at your peak energy and alertness is essential for achieving your personal peak performance. Once you identify your most valuable hours, reserve that time for knocking out the highest priority items on your list. Protect this time from all unnecessary intrusions and interruptions. Save all the routine tasks like responding to email, returning phone calls, meetings, etc. for the other hours in your work day.

The way you manage your time will determine your accomplishment. Effective time management is about utilizing your time proactively – taking the few minutes that are necessary in order to create your to-do list, prioritize it, and use your most valuable hours for your highest priority items.